Controlling the conversation (or trying to, anyway)

On a balmy November morning in San Francisco, with clear blue skies, clean air and a view of the Golden Gate Bridge, being a recovering foreign correspondent feels pretty darned painless. There is, after all, a reason why so many people who live in San Francisco rave about it, why so many who visit wish…

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Democracy, debt & US dysfunction: An imagined conversation in China’s halls of power

Ah, cliffhangers.  I write this hours before the United States Congress is set to vote on an agreement to reopen government and avert a US default on debt.  For a few weeks.   And then, we’ll rinse and repeat. How must this look in China’s halls of power?   In tribute to The Economist’s Gady Epstein as…

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The Medill F

Some things have changed, since I was a freshman at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism in 1979, banging out copy on second-hand manual typewriters. Now Medill has a flashy new building, and state-of-the-art technology all around, I found at a reunion this past weekend.  But apparently, one thing hasn’t changed.   “I’ve already gotten…

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Homecoming

Strong feelings can bubble up around the topic of class reunions.  For some, they’re a chance to reconnect with a moment in youth when everything seemed possible.  For others, they’re an uncomfortable step back into a past they’re glad they’ve moved on from. Me, I’ve only been to one high school reunion – my fifth…

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You can’t go home again — or can you?

When I tried out my blog title, “Recovering Foreign Correspondent,” on an old friend and former China correspondent from a dozen years back, she shook her head glumly. “You never recover,” she said. That may be. And really, who would want to? Being a foreign correspondent is one of the greatest jobs on the planet.…

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